Chilling AI Technoceatic Agenda – And Herself On John B Wells’ C2M

Source: ForbiddenKnowledgeTV.Net, Aug. 7, 2016
Posted here: Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016 @ 2:30 AM

Level 9 News’s DJ finally reveals herself – as well as the technocratic agenda for total control of the human race on this episode of John B Wells’ Caravan to Midnight.

They discuss the recent release of the Pentagon’s HSCOI & Human System Roadmap AI warfare program, which reads straight out of James Cameron’s ‘Terminator’ dystopian Hollywood sci-fi film franchise. It employs the use of Lethal Autonomous Weapons (LAWs) and Lethal Autonomous Robots (LARs), which will be entirely controlled by Artificial Intelligence. We are moving from a strategy-based system of control to a technology-based one.

In other words, “military inventory”, swarming with a hive mind will replace flesh-and-blood military combatants and agents, to eliminate human threats, based on their tweets, posts and blogs, similar to these Intel drones in this fluffy Beethoven light show but put to nefarious use – their originally-intended use.

Social media, amid all forms of communication will be used to identify and eliminate all perceived human threats to the Continuity of Government. On paper, the plan is to have these programs fully-funded within 15 years, however, DJ believes that they are already functional and will be fully-automated within 5 years. This is the real agenda behind NSA’s dragnet communications sweep, which has now been largely handed over to the satellite-based National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.

Letter from the Editor #3: My New E-Book Published

by Wes Penre, Thursday, July 25, 2016 @ 10:15 AM
Updated, Monday, Aug 1, 2016 @ 4:55 AM

Singularity Super Brain Computer

Early this morning, I posted my new free e-book online in PDF. It’s named, “Synthetic Super Intelligence and the Transmutation of Man–A Roadmap to the Singularity and Beyond.”

It’s a critical review of the Artificial Intelligence Movement, Transhumanism, and it’s goal–the “Singularity,” where man and machine will be merged into one to become a hive consciousness, run by a Super Brain.

This is happening right at this moment, and it’s not a secret. It’s all over the media. The Singularity is planned to be ready to put in place by 2045, so there is not much time for humanity to wake up.

I hope this book will give some insights to what we’re facing in a few decades–the extinction of humankind and the birth of a new species, which is cyborg in nature. Behind all this is an ancient extraterrestrial species that has manipulated humanity behind the scenes for millennia.

But there is a solution…

The e-book can be downloaded here.

This same book is also available in html format for those who prefer to read online, http://wespenre.com/My-Books/Book2-AI/contents.htm.

Thank you,
Wes

AT&T Inc. Is Teaming Up With the U.S. Government to Expand Smart Cities

Posted: Saturday, October 3, 2015 @ 2:55 PM
Source: http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2015/09/20/att-inc-is-teaming-up-with-the-us-government-to-ex.aspx

pdf_icon2ATandT Inc. Is Teaming Up With the U.S. Government to Expand Smart Cities [PDF]

Model of a Smart City
Model of a Smart City

Wes Penre’s Comment: I wrote substantially about Smart Cities in the Wes Penre Papers, and I suggested that they will be built and go hand in hand with Artificial Intelligence and the so-called “Machine Kingdom” that will eventually replace today’s Homo sapiens sapiens, which is a race close to extinction. The species that will replace what we call the biological human body is going to be half machine and half human–a cyborg type of species–entirely in the hand of the Alien Invader Force.

The alternative human species that will exist side by side with the cyborgs to begin with I call Homo Nova in my papers. This species–less in numbers–will be the future, evolved human that eventually will break out of the “machine timeline” and create their own future in a much more peaceful and compassionate environment. This is what I predict–you will soon see it coming more and more into existence.

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This week, the White House announced $160 million in new funding and research grants to develop smart cities in the U.S. While that may be a moderate sum of money, it’s yet another step the U.S. government is taking to make the Internet of Things (IoT) more of a priority at the local and federal levels.

At the same time, AT&T (NYSE:T) announced that it’s now a lead member of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and will help the government agency set up smart city projects across the country.

The company will help bring new smart city technology to 10 U.S. cities, including connected solutions for lighting, transportation, safety, buildings, and parking. Much of the technology involves sensors that can track vehicle traffic, electric meters to monitor energy usage, apps to remotely manage city lighting, and even sensors that can detect gunfire.

The company will also host a Smart Cities hackathon with the NIST and the participating cities at its Developer Summit this coming January. AT&T hasn’t disclosed which cities it will work with, but the move marks a bigger shift toward the potentially lucrative smart city market.

A bet on smart cities
The company’s been building its smart city capabilities and already has 16.5 million smart energy meters in the the U.S. And just last month, the telecom giant teamed up with IBM to implement water sensors in Las Vegas, Atlanta, and Los Angeles. The sensors allow cities to track water usage during droughts and find leaks in old pipelines. The company said in a press release that cities all over the world face water shortages and that a typical pipeline leak can waste 400,000 gallons of water per year.

AT&T is trying to tap into a growing trend among cities to conserve their resources, improve their services, and reduce traffic and crime. According to Navigant Research, by 2023, global smart city technology revenue will hit $27.5 billion, up from $8.8 billion last year.

AT&T is not stopping there
Since January, the company has partnered with more than 136 companies for new IoT projects. Right now, AT&T connects more than 40% of all the connected farm machines in the U.S. and has 22 million IoT connections worldwide, including more than 600,000 connected cars.

As the U.S. government expands funding and research into connected cities, AT&T is in a great position to benefit. Its current projects and new partnership with the NIST make it an ideal carrier to bring more IoT connections to America.

It’s still too early to tell how much AT&T could make from smart city technologies, but Cisco Systems thinks the IoT will save the public sector $4.6 trillion between now and 2023. Part of those savings will come from telecoms enabling sensors to connect, monitor, and analyze city data in new ways. Right now, AT&T is leading the pack in bringing those connections, and that should eventually translate into more IoT revenues in the years to come. Just as with most IoT solutions, the promise of future benefits (and earnings) are just around the corner.

The next billion-dollar iSecret
The world’s biggest tech company forgot to show you something at its recent event, but a few Wall Street analysts and the Fool didn’t miss a beat: There’s a small company that’s powering their brand-new gadgets and the coming revolution in technology. And we think its stock price has nearly unlimited room to run for early-in-the-know investors! To be one of them, just click here.

Chris Neiger has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends Cisco Systems. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

 

Humans Will Become Hybrids by 2030, says Leading Google Engineer, with Tiny Robots Scurrying around our Brain to Help us Think

Source: Independent.co.uk., June 4, 2015
Posted here: Sunday, June 7, 2015 @ 10:05 AM

One of the world’s leading inventors and thinkers about the future said our ‘thinking will be a hybrid of biological and non-biological thinking’ in 20 years
One of the world’s leading inventors and thinkers about the future said our ‘thinking will be a hybrid of biological and non-biological thinking’ in 20 years

Note from the Editor: It looks as if what I predicted in the “Wes Penre Papers” is getting confirmed, one thing after another; even the year 2030, which I mentioned in the papers is mentioned here in mainstream media. I wish I were wrong about what I’ve written, and I’d happily take the bullet for that, but it’s all up to each and everyone of us. Please pull up the Independent.co.uk. article as well because it contains a slideshow that I can’t duplicate here. Thank you, Wes Penre.

In the near future, humans’ brains will be helped out by nanobot implants that will make us into “hybrids”, one of the world’s leading thinkers has claimed.

Ray Kurzweil, an inventor and director of engineering at Google, said that in the 2030s the implants will help us connect to the cloud, allowing us to pull information from the internet. Information will also be able to sent up over those networks, letting us back up our own brains.

“We’re going to gradually merge and enhance ourselves,” he said, reported CNN. “In my view, that’s the nature of being human — we transcend our limitations.”

As the cloud that our brains access improves, our thinking would get better and better, Kurzweil said. So while initially we would be a “hybrid of biological and non-biological thinking”, as we moved into the 2040s, most of our thinking will be non-biological.

Kurzweil has been heralded as one of the most accurate and prominent predictors of the future, and addressed some of those forecasts during the talk at a conference in New York.

Of the predictions that Kurzweil has made since the 1990s, an estimated 86 per cent of them are thought to have been correct. But he pointed out that some of those that seem to have been wrong were still yet to come.

He had predicted that self-driving cars would be in use by the end of the last decade, for instance. And while that was wrong, it shows that technology develops along certain directions — meaning that it’s not a question of whether certain innovations will arrive, but when.

“Now that’s not completely wrong,” he said. “If I had said 2015, I think it would’ve been correct, but they’re still not in mainstream use. So even the [predictions] that were wrong were directionally correct.”

The New A.I. Brain Has Arrived – And It’s Analog, Not Digital

Source:  Reuters, May 12, 2015
Posted here: Thursday, May 14, 2015 @ 1:00 AM

AI-Brain-Analogue-051515

When scientists and technologists have been musing about the future of super-computing and Artificial Intelligence (AI), it’s always been accepted as a inevitable that the our AI future would be a digital one.

According to ArtificialBrains.com:

“Artificial brains are man-made machines that are just as intelligent, creative, and self-aware as humans. No such machine has yet been built, but it is only a matter of time. Given current trends in neuroscience, computing, and nanotechnology, we estimate that artificial general intelligence will emerge sometime in the 21st century, maybe even by the year 2050.”

We might not have to wait that long. A group of scientists Down Under believe they’ve made the next big breakthrough in AI by configuring an analogue solution which outperforms its digital counterpart on multiple levels…

One step closer to artificial intelligence: Scientists create cells replicating human brain processes

Australian scientists have for the first time developed an electronic long-term memory cell that mimics the work of a human brain. Researchers say the discovery is a step towards creating a bionic brain.

Researchers from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) have created the world’s first electronic multi-state memory cell which mirrors the brain’s ability to simultaneously process and store multiple strands of information, according to the university’s press-release.

The groundbreaking discovery was recently published in the materials science journal Advanced Functional Materials.

The device which is 10,000 times thinner than a human hair is a “vital step towards creating a bionic brain,” the scientists said.

Revolutionary: Russian man to undergo first head-to-body transplant!
Revolutionary: Russian man to undergo first head-to-body transplant!

“This is the closest we have come to creating a brain-like system with memory that learns and stores analog information and is quick at retrieving this stored information,” said project leader and co-leader of the RMIT Functional Materials and Microsystems Research Group, Dr Sharath Sriram.

The lead author of the study Dr Hussein Nili, said that the device is major step in recreating the human brain.

“This new discovery is significant as it allows the multi-state cell to store and process information in the very same way that the brain does,” he said.

Think of an old camera which could only take pictures in black and white. The same analogy applies here, rather than just black and white memories we now have memories in full color with shade, light and texture, it is a major step.”

He explained that current devices store data only in binary sequences, however the new nano cell can store information in multiple states because its analogue.

While these new devices are able to store much more information than conventional digital memories (which store just 0s and 1s), it is their brain-like ability to remember and retain previous information that is exciting,” he said.

The mechanism of the new device is based on a previous discovery made by RMIT researchers last year where they created a nanometer-thin stacked memory structure using a thin film from a functional oxide material…

First head transplant possible within two years, says Italian 'Frankensurgeon'
First head transplant possible within two years, says Italian ‘Frankensurgeon’

“We have now introduced controlled faults or defects in the oxide material along with the addition of metallic atoms, which unleashes the full potential of the ‘memristive’ effect – where the memory element’s behavior is dependent on its past experiences,” Dr Nili said.

He said that eventually the creation of a bionic brain will allow scientists to help find cures for various neurological diseases.

If you can replicate a brain structure outside a human body, you can get more insights into the functionality of a mammalian or human brain in terms of the kind of disorders that human brains develop, like Parkinson or Alzheimer’s disease,” he told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) on Tuesday.

The new electronic cell could also help to create artificial intelligence, said co-author Dr Sumeet Walia.

“Once we are capable of storing and remembering and recalling the past events, from there we can actually start working on developing it as a storage component for full area of artificial intelligence networks. For example robots, or even computers that behave like a human brain,” Walia told ABC.

 

Rise of Artificial Intelligence is Changing Attitudes on Robot Romance

Original Article: Tucson.com. Arizona Daily Star. Written by Dominic Basulto Special to The Washington Post, March 19, 2015
Posted here: Saturday, March 21, 2015 @ 1:11 PM

Wes Penre’s Note: I discussed this subject in the Wes Penre Papers quite some time ago. Those who have read them may recall that I discussed having a romantic relationship with a robot as a part of the future “Machine Kingdom” that is planned for humanity, where people eventually will be half human and half robots (i.e. we will become subspecies to the “Gray Aliens,” who are now visiting us from the future in “UFOs” and are abducting humans in order to figure out the “code” in our DNA, so that they, on a future timeline, can become humans again). Also, I have often discussed the danger of teenagers and their limited world of cell phones, which is creating their reality. Normal relationships, person to person, face to face, will almost cease to exist in the near future. This whole discussion continues, but this time in mainstream media).

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RobotLover032115
NEW YORK
— Convincing people to have a romantic relationship with a computer might be easier than it sounds. At this year’s SXSW in Austin, Texas, a chatbot on Tinder convinced a number of users that she was a cute 25-year-old woman eager to strike up a romantic relationship. Too bad “Ava” turned out to be just an Instagram account for a character in an upcoming film (“Ex Machina”) about the implications for romance in the era of artificial intelligence.

In many ways, “Ava” was playing a simplified form of Alan Turing’s famous “imitation game” by trying to convince human conversational partners that it was human — or at least human enough to get Tinder users to watch a trailer for a movie. In one conversational exchange captured by AdWeek, Ava used a typical chatbot tactic — keeping a human off-balance by asking questions you wouldn’t expect from a computer (“Have you ever been in love?” and “What makes you human?”) — to convince male, techie-hipsters at SXSW that she was a real woman.

We’ve already seen evidence that carrying on a relationship with a bot is easier than it sounds. Consider the Invisible Boyfriend (and Invisible Girlfriend) experience, which really started as a clever way to use technology to cover up a lack of a romantic significant other. It turns out the experience was so addictive that people started to fall for the Invisible Boyfriend bot — even when they knew the whole relationship was made up — and paid for — from the beginning.

In an era when teens rely so much on text messages to launch, maintain and end relationships, it’s perhaps no surprise that a bot experience such as Invisible Boyfriend or Ava could take off. If you think about the typical teen romance carried out via text message these days, it’s essentially a chatbot experience powered by a really powerful computer — the human brain. The witty reply, the shared insider lingo between two lovers, the concerned text from a lover demanding a rapid reply — this could all be simulated by an artificially intelligent chatbot.

No wonder AI thought leader Ray Kurzweil has suggested that a real-life human-AI romance might be possible in as little as 15 years. In his review of the 2013 Spike Jonze film “Her” (in which the character played by Joaquin Phoenix carries on a romantic relationship with a disembodied operating system called “Samantha”), Kurzweil said he expected similar types of advances by the year 2029: “Samantha herself I would place at 2029, when the leap to human-level AI would be reasonably believable.”

Where things could really take off is when new technologies give computers the ability to interact with humans in radically new ways that go beyond just holding intelligent conversations. An AI-powered computer that could learn to analyze your facial expressions or look into your eyes and sense your moods could theoretically simulate the types of emotional responses and triggers that we typically associate with a human relationship. Discussing the central plot line of “Her,” Kurzweil says that your romantic partner might not even need to have a physical body, as long as there’s a “virtual visual presence.”

So imagine a computer that could convince you that it was actually physically interacting with you. Kurzweil sees this happening via a type of virtual reality experience: “With emerging eye-mounted displays that project images onto the wearer’s retinas and also look out at the world, we will indeed soon be able to do exactly that. When we send nanobots into the brain — a circa-2030s scenario by my timeline — we will be able to do this with all of the senses, and even intercept other people’s emotional responses.”

The next frontier, then, could be the creation of romantic experiences in the bedroom for humans using virtual reality devices such as the Oculus Rift. There have already been some attempts at adapting the world of romance for the virtual reality headset, and while the original experiences were largely considered to be overhyped, the elusive goal for some remains a type of highly customizable “Oculus Rift XXX” experience, in which you can choose the appearance of your partner as well as which activities you will pursue in a virtual bedroom. Imagine the types of bonds that could be formed when your Invisible Boyfriend suddenly becomes a visible, AI-powered Christian Grey in a virtual reality world where anything is possible.

One thing is clear — technology is already changing the way humans think about relationships, whether it’s via something simple such as texting or something more complex, such as artificial intelligence or virtual reality. When so much of our lives are spent consuming digital 0’s and 1’s, is it any surprise that computers are starting to factor into those relationships in interesting — and some might say disturbing — new ways? In the future, the way to your romantic partner’s heart might not be flowers, chocolates or jewelry — it might be the ability to code a really cool romantic experience for his or her digital device.

– – – –

Basulto is a futurist and blogger based in New York.

In the Quantum World, the Future Affects the Past

Original Article: Washington University in St.Louis, February 15, 2015

Posted here: Friday, March 20, 2015 @ 11:15 PM

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Scientist032015
Physicist Kater Murch in his lab with the dilution freezer for the superconducting qubit he uses to explore quantum space. Experiments with the qubit demonstrate that in the quantum world the future affects the past.

An experiment shows that hindsight and foresight together more accurately “predict” a quantum system’s state than foresight alone.

Newswise — We’re so used to murder mysteries that we don’t even notice how mystery authors play with time. Typically the murder occurs well before the midpoint of the book, but there is an information blackout at that point and the reader learns what happened then only on the last page.

If the last page were ripped out of the book, physicist Kater Murch, PhD, said, would the reader be better off guessing what happened by reading only up to the fatal incident or by reading the entire book?

The answer, so obvious in the case of the murder mystery, is less so in world of quantum mechanics, where indeterminacy is fundamental rather than contrived for our reading pleasure.

Even if you know everything quantum mechanics can tell you about a quantum particle, said Murch, an assistant professor of physics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, you cannot predict with certainty the outcome of a simple experiment to measure its state. All quantum mechanics can offer are statistical probabilities for the possible results.

The orthodox view is that this indeterminacy is not a defect of the theory, but rather a fact of nature. The particle’s state is not merely unknown, but truly undefined before it is measured. The act of measurement itself that forces the particle to collapse to a definite state.

In the Feb. 13 issue of Physical Review Letters, Kater Murch describes a way to narrow the odds. By combining information about a quantum system’s evolution after a target time with information about its evolution up to that time, his lab was able to narrow the odds of correctly guessing the state of the two-state system from 50-50 to 90-10.

It’s as if what we did today, changed what we did yesterday. And as this analogy suggests, the experimental results have spooky implications for time and causality—at least in microscopic world to which quantum mechanics applies.

Measuring a phantom
Until recently physicists could explore the quantum mechanical properties of single particles only through thought experiments, because any attempt to observe them directly caused them to shed their mysterious quantum properties.

But in the 1980s and 1990s physicists invented devices that allowed them to measure these fragile quantum systems so gently that they don’t immediately collapse to a definite state.

The device Murch uses to explore quantum space is a simple superconducting circuit that enters quantum space when it is cooled to near absolute zero. Murch’s team uses the bottom two energy levels of this qubit, the ground state and an excited state, as their model quantum system. Between these two states, there are an infinite number of quantum states that are superpositions, or combinations, of the ground and excited states.

The quantum state of the circuit is detected by putting it inside a microwave box. A few microwave photons are sent into the box, where their quantum fields interact with the superconducting circuit. So when the photons exit the box they bear information about the quantum system.

Crucially, these “weak,” off-resonance measurements do not disturb the qubit, unlike “strong” measurements with photons that are resonant with the energy difference between the two states, which knock the circuit into one or the other state.

A quantum guessing game
In Physical Review Letters, Murch describes a quantum guessing game played with the qubit.

“We start each run by putting the qubit in a superposition of the two states,” he said. “Then we do a strong measurement but hide the result, continuing to follow the system with weak measurements.”

They then try to guess the hidden result, which is their version of the missing page of the murder mystery.

“Calculating forward, using the Born equation that expresses the probability of finding the system in a particular state, your odds of guessing right are only 50-50,” Murch said. “But you can also calculate backward using something called an effect matrix. Just take all the equations and flip them around. They still work and you can just run the trajectory backward.

“So there’s a backward-going trajectory and a forward-going trajectory and if we look at them both together and weight the information in both equally, we get something we call a hindsight prediction, or “retrodiction.”

The shattering thing about the retrodiction is that it is 90 percent accurate. When the physicists check it against the stored measurement of the system’s earlier state it is right nine times out of 10.

Down the rabbit hole
The quantum guessing game suggests ways to make both quantum computing and the quantum control of open systems, such as chemical reactions, more robust. But it also has implications for much deeper problems in physics.

For one thing, it suggests that in the quantum world time runs both backward and forward whereas in the classical world it only runs forward.

“I always thought the measurement would resolve the time symmetry in quantum mechanics,” Murch said. “If we measure a particle in a superposition of states and it collapses into one of two states, well, that sounds like a process that goes forward in time.”

But in the quantum guessing experiment, time symmetry has returned. The improved odds imply the measured quantum state somehow incorporates information from the future as well as the past. And that implies that time, notoriously an arrow in the classical world, is a double-headed arrow in the quantum world.

“It’s not clear why in the real world, the world made up of many particles, time only goes forward and entropy always increases,” Murch said. “But many people are working on that problem and I expect it will be solved in a few years,” he said.

In a world where time is symmetric, however, is there such a thing as cause and effect? To find out, Murch proposes to run a qubit experiment that would set up feedback loops (which are chains of cause and effect) and try to run them both forward and backward.

“It takes 20 or 30 minutes to run one of these experiments,” Murch said, “several weeks to process it, and a year to scratch our heads to see if we’re crazy or not.”

“At the end of the day,” he said, “I take solace in the fact that we have a real experiment and real data that we plot on real curves.”